Cleansing the doors of cinematic perception since 1987

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

2008 - ACIDEMIC YEAR ROUND-UP

If it wasn't for the last minute WRESTLER, I'd have been really bummed about 2008, movie-wise. Luckily, I finally got cable; TCM stepped in for me as the big DVD companies all started re-releasing the Same Old Crap on blu-ray rather than digging out the missing essentials we're still waiting for. There were exceptions of course (like MOONTIDE and ROADHOUSE with Kim Morgan commentary!) but in general the pickins have been slim as far as movies that actually break a mold or two, instead of just delivering the same old sermons... Next time, o lord, Don't deliver us from evil. Let the Joker win, just to see what happens.

In the tradition of the excellent Dancing Image, here are Erich's Ten Best Essays of 2008*:

1. The Foxy, the Dead and the Foxier: Bright Lights Film Journal
2. Barbara Stanwyck in Ten Cents a Dance: Acidemic
3. American Cinema Pantheon - Paul Thomas Anderson: Acidemic
4. Replicanting Bladerunner: Bright Lights Film Journal
5. The Passion and the Prurience: Water Lilies - review (pictured top): Nathan R's Film Experience Blog (as guest blogger)
6. Succubus and the Moebius Strip: Acidemic Journal of Film & Media
7. Kim Morgan, Moontide & Remorae: Bright Lights After Dark
8. Miriam Hopkins and the Pre-Code Menage a Trois: Bright Lights After Dark
9. Naomi Watts: Cinema's Post-Modern Mother of Mirrors: Bright Lights Film Journal
10. There Will Be Blood and Brutus Jones: Bright Lights After Dark

RUNNER UP: TAKE THIS UNBORN CHILD AND SHOVE IT! and If you don't like MARGOT AT THE WEDDING, I'll get you in YOUR SLEEP!

* - (Selected by a handpicked panel of the finest imitation wood.)

5 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. I joined the BL family late in 2008 (although supposedly I'm getting a profile page in the Feb issue...oh yeah!) so I didn't catch all these the first time around -- working through them now. Your piece on Paul Thomas Anderson would likely make David Thomson (who joined the PTA club long ago and seems to think him the savior of American cinema) wet his pants. I was also glad to see that I was not the only person who loved "Margot At The Wedding". With Whit Stillman MIA and Wes Anderson off in la la land Baumbach is the only trace of bookish New Wave-ism left among US indies. I told a friend of mine who despised "Margo" that his negative assessment was dead wrong and he said "Yeah...but you're a writer!" Whatever.

    By the way, have you seen "The Pervert's Guide to Cinema"? It's Zizek's little movie round-up/essay/mindfuck. I had problems with it but would be curious for your take, given your obvious affection for Lacan...

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  3. Thanks, Jon, I've seen part on the The Pervert's Guide since it came free with the Believer. I have to say I was turned off by all his shit analogies. Surely there's better metaphors to use! Also, like most scholars, he resorted to scopophia-driven simplification rather than Jungian mythification (which I use in my THE LACAN HOUR, which came out first, so who is to say Zizek wasn't inspired by it via youtube?

    Anyway, mine has more bitches. Zizek needs to exit the anal stage and move up a chakra or two, man. This is Hithcock we're talking about! This the BIBLE!

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  4. Glad to know I'm not the only one who's ambivalent about the Z man. I wouldn't be surprised if your opus DID influence him, such is his taste for bleeding edge pop culture. Also, that Lacan theme song would influence anybody.

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  5. Thanks pal, I just read your Z man piece and it's pretty terrific. You really nailed the problem.

    Even my beloved Camille Paglia seems to be showing signs of this hardening of the opinions, via her distrust of the internet. Of course if I was a well-respected print author I'D be worried too. We're gonna bury them!

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